LET'S LEARN JAPANESE WITH LUNA! PART 7

Welcome to part 7 of Japanese lessons with ZenPop's mascot Luna. In this series, we look at a frame from ZenPop’s original manga, FULL MOON MAGIC and teach you some Japanese expressions, grammar, and interesting facts mentioned there. The manga is drawn and written by a talented Japanese manga artist so it is currently entirely in Japanese, but there are some English translations available in the captions. Read it for free on Instagram here.

 

Let’s start Lesson 7!

 

Hey short-ears! 

Start working or you’ll be sent to Earth!

Let's learn Japanese with Luna! Part 7

おい!

そこの短い耳のウサギ! 

Oi!

Soko no mijikai mimi no Usagi!

 

働かないなら

地球に連れてくぞ!

Hatarakanai nara

Chikyuu ni tsuretekuzo!



~ Sentence 1 ~ 

 

おい (oi)

This is a simple interjection which is equal to “Hey” in English. It is quite frequently used.

 

そこの・短い耳の・ウサギ (soko no mijikai mimi no Usagi)

This phrase is pretty short, but for better understanding, let’s divide it into parts anyway!

 

If we remove an adjective from this sentence, we will have a simpler one:

そこのウサギ (soko no Usagi)

 

そこ (soko) means “there” and is a preposition of place. Add a particle の (no) to it and the construction is ready to be used in a sentence, where の (no) is pointing to a subject of speech. 

 

ウサギ (Usagi) means “bunny”, which refers to Luna-chan in this context. Usagi here is written in katakana, not hiragana as usual. Words normally written in hiragana or kanji can be written in katakana if you are trying to lend emphasis. We can speculate that perhaps in this case, the grey bunny is saying ウサギ loudly, or it is a way of having Luna-chan stand out compared to the other bunnies, since she is the protagonist of the story. 

 

Let's learn Japanese with Luna! Part 7

 

Basically そこのウサギ (soko no Usagi) means “Bunny over there!”, but now, let’s add the adjective back to this sentence:

 

そこの・短い耳の・ウサギ (soko no mijikai mimi no Usagi)

 

短い耳の (mijikai mimi no) means “having short ears”. 

短い (mijikai) is short, and 耳 (mimi) is an ear (or ears). As we already know, the の (no) particle shows that the adjective is related to something/someone. This time, it’s related to ウサギ. 

By translating every part of the sentence, we’ll have “Hey, short-eared bunny over there!”, or the simpler one: “Hey, short-ears!”. 

 

~ Sentence 2 ~

 

働かないなら (hatarakanai nara) consists of the verb 働く (hataraku) “to work”, negation particle ない (nai) “not”, and a particle なら (nara) “if”. 

 

働かないなら is basically an if-clause (or a conditional sentence). This means it is dependent on the main clause.  

 

地球に連れてくぞ (chikyuu ni tsuretekuzo) can be roughly divided into 2 parts:

 

  • 地球に (chikyuu ni), which means “to the Earth”. We covered 地球 in a previous lesson so you should know that this means “Earth”! に (ni) is a particle which shows a direction, answering the question “where”.
  • 連れてくぞ (tsuretekuzo) is formed from the verb 連れる (tsureru), “to bring along” and a particle ぞ (zo), which adds force or indicates command (so the black bunny is the boss here, sorry Luna). 

 

Let's Learn Japanese with Luna Part 7!

 

働かないなら・地球に連れてくぞ (Hatarakanai nara chikyuu ni tsuretekuzo) 

It can be translated as “If you don’t work, you’ll get sent to Earth!” or our initial version: “Start working or you’ll be sent to Earth!

 

Let’s review:

おい!

そこの短い耳のウサギ! 

Oi!

Soko no mijikai mimi no Usagi!

Hey

short-ears! 



働かないなら

地球に連れてくぞ!

Hatarakanai nara

Chikyuu ni tsuretekuzo!

Start working

or you'll be sent to Earth!



That’s all for today! Did Luna-chan get sent to Earth? Find out by reading the FULL MOON MAGIC manga with us on Instagram! 

 

Previous lessons:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

 


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Article| 09/07/2019 | nihongoZenpop